- toshihiro komatsu home
- Essay

TOSHIHIRO KOMATSU – OPTICAL ARTEFACTS FOR THE BODY
Fernando Quesada
This text was written for O Monografias Body issue published in May 2002, Barcelona, Spain


The space of a gallery or of a museum can identify itself with a fabricated historical space.  The main task of the commissioner of an exhibition, and even more so the director or programmer of a museum, is to furnish an initial setting with a mixture of works and lend it a contextual structure which facilitates its assimilation within the wider organised frame of that which we know has taken place before this exhibition, from the past.  In this way it is possible to establish the figure of the analogy between a space where works of art are exhibited and the history of art itself.

Toshihiro Komatsu makes perforations in the walls and floors of the areas where he exhibits his periscopes-kaleidoscope, that is to say, he builds a net, a den, which crosses walls and wrought iron beams.  By way of this net den the spectator is invited to follow a route which will lead him to places which are outside of the exhibition area, or more to the point, to places which are latent in the exhibition area itself but which are usually covered by the new, by each work of art which is exhibited there.

The periscope, built with mirrors in its inner face, provokes two phenomenon in the observer, the first is the multiplication of the optical field, and the second is the prolongation of the body and of its sensory faculties, that is to say, the stretching of its senses to infinity.  The second term is only possible due to the existence of the first, which catapults the sensory organs outwards.

Thus the kaleidoscopic prisms establish an intricate web, but continuous, which more or less simulates the burrow of a rodent, a hare or mole.  A spatial scheme which is imposed on that which already exists but which illuminates the dark or veiled areas having perforated the surface of the walls and ceilings, connecting different spatial areas, be it two adjoining rooms, the exterior and interior of the exhibition area, the upper or lower floors, etc.

It is obvious that the periscopes transform the spatial perception of those things which they perforate, but to what extent do they perforate time and our representation of time?

It could be said that in the same way that they have repercussions on spatial differences between areas they also have repercussions, in another order, on  time differences, making everything happen at the same time, but therefore they would function in the same way as a closed circuit recording, and this does not occur here.

In the work of Komatsu both situations are given simultaneously: the launch of sensory channels in space (exposed space, art space) and in time (the time of the perception of the work and of the life of the perforated place).  When we look into, for example, a periscope which perforates the ground making the floor below visible we are not only discovering what is happening below due to our pan-optical vigilance, but we are also projected below by the periscope, which alternatively situates us below and above, in both spaces and in both times, different as they are in themselves, multiplying our body analogously in the same way that the kaleidoscopic images of the mirrors, with which these artefacts are made, are multiplied.

In Adjoining Spaces and in Observatory this operation is carried out in an exhibition area, tunnelling in the space provided by several rooms of a museum and by one room respectively, installing dens which connect one place with another.

This very same operation carried out on an abandoned, traditional, Japanese house, O-House, results in another type of perforation, carried out in space and, more emphatically in this case, in time.  In this case moments of the past of this house are illuminated along with its day-to-day existence.  Again the effect is the same as that of an excavator, opening canal ways or sensory channels, between places and moments which belong to co-ordinates more or less distant from each other, but building with the exercise a new picture or scene, which is none other than the infinite multitude of images which each spectator generates by looking into and submerging himself in each of the periscopes.  The fragmented image is neither a mimesis of a chaotic and kaleidoscopic surrounding reality nor is it a microscope, a camera or a documentary, that is the product of a reproduction of a scene.  The fragmented image is more like a representation projected into the future, not into the past, although in the crossbeam, because each spectator, once submerged in the kaleidoscope, experiences a simultaneous projection towards another moment in the same place, but at the same time is completely conscious of his own moment.  It can be as well put inversely, projected to another place in the same time being fully conscious of his spatial position.  The observer is installed optically in the past and the present, here and there, to produce, in this simultaneousness, an incessant chain of new images.

In the middle of the nineteenth century Baudelaire called the experience of looking through a kaleidoscope the quintessence of the modern gaze, the fragmented look, produced by the sensorial shock of the large city.  In those days the kaleidoscope was an optical artefact which enjoyed an enormous popularity for the simple reason that it made possible the impossible: to trap within a controlled frame the fragmented world of reality.  And at the same time it trained the people’s eyes to practise the inevitable kaleidoscopic look avoiding the trauma of an injured retina produced by the stimulated chaos. 

This kaleidoscopic look sent the body to sleep and completely minimised the exercise of the rest of the senses.  The kaleidoscope thus became popular, but it was unimaginable that, for example, a sonorous artefact of similar characteristics could ever have converted itself into an object of mass entertainment during the second half of the nineteenth century or even later.  We just need an example, the intonarumori of the futurist Luigi Russolo, which was a musical instrument which imitated the urban cacophony, was a rarity even in the first decade of the twentieth century when it was invented and utilised.  It was an artefact which had absolutely no meaning whatsoever outside of the circles of the elite experiments of the historic avant-garde.  Due to the popularity of the optical artefact Baudelaire was prompted to describe thus the modern citizen, that of the great city, a “kaleidoscope equipped with conscience”.

It is important to compare these kaleidoscopes with one of the best known examples of architectural spectacles, that which was built in Cologne by Bruno Taut for the Werkbund Show of 1914.  In this piece of work, a tribute to the poet Paul Scheerbart, we have a kaleidoscope positioned above a cave.  A modern archetype – optical, translucent, sparkling, ethereal – above an ancient archetype – tactile, shapeless, dark, cavernous.  In Taut’s pavilion the translucent dome produces a series of kaleidoscopic constructions created by the way it was built with coloured glass and its faceted shape.  The resulting effect must have been something similar to a pure spectacle of light and movement, a translation of the kaleidoscopic optic to three dimensions, an architectural visual symphony.  However, under this dome the spectator does not gain admittance to any reality, to another space or time distinct and different to his own, but to a place outside of reality and history, without co-ordinates, in which the body takes on a conscience of its own, although not to autonomously steady itself, but instead to merge with the sensorial environment generated by the dome of coloured glass.

In Komatsu’s periscopes the body also merges, although only for a moment, with the environment which surrounds it, like a first step to awakening, for which the first state is optical saturation.  However, having generated images which do have definite co-ordinates, the body is immediately returned to reality, as happens when we observe through the periscope the passing of another spectator situated on the floor below or in the adjoining enclosure.  In this way no construction is being pursued from a totality formed by the union between the surrounding environment – spatial and sensorial medium – and the body itself, but it is more like an exaggeration of the presence of the body which power, technology and means of communication tend to make disappear.

In 1745 Condillac said that the ray of light, that which strikes our retina, produces a sensation in it which is not reflected in the other end of the same ray, that is in the observed object, but only in our eye.  Every strike on the retina would thus be equivalent to grasping a stick with the hand for the first time.  The eyes are for Condillac exactly like two hands supplied with sticks, and the little sticks, present in the eye, make of this the place of the fixation of our representations.  Thus speaking we would be, above any other thing, an eye.

It seems on first sight that these observations could be taken as predictions, in as much as our culture is completely ocular-centred: everything passes for the eye and everything is flattened.

In the traditional perspective we have the vanishing point and the point of view as symmetrical and empty moments, ideal, always to be filled.  Condillac has already placed something in one of them: the retina.  Since then we can say that in the contemplation of a modern painting the body is made to disappear, and is made a pure eye.  However, in every historical moment in which this polarisation towards the disembodiment of the spectator has been stressed, in particular with the revolutions of perspective, of photography, of cinema and finally of the computer and its extra-flat screen, a factor of compensation, of realignment or reinvention of the spectator as a body which sees, and not a pure eye, has always been introduced.  Following this other tradition the optical kaleidoscope of Komatsu is installed.

The view through his artefacts is not optical, but physiological, and therefore not equivalent to looking at a modern painting.  Apparently the kaleidoscopic prisms are machines for producing abstract paintings, however, again, this does not happen here.  Time enters to form part of the painting that they offer us, corporeal time, and no other.  The incorporeal eye of the abstraction once again reclaims its body, and the clearest manifestation is the introduction of physical time in these kaleidoscopes.

The space which they generate becomes thus an enveloping space, not a scene set before the spectator but around the spectator, and time does not become fabricated for the spectator but it has to be built with the act of looking at the artefact, each time.  It deals with a localised time, of a now.  And the same can be said with respect to space, it deals with a very determined here, for that which the periscope does not offer any time-space totality, but co-ordinates which continually change depending on the position of the spectator and the moment in which he observes, as well as the presence of other spectators in the adjoining spaces which the periscope connects.

The mirrors are positioned in such a way so that they literally reflect our image, but also multiply fragments of that which surrounds us, thus constructing an environment in which the body finds itself submerged, surrounded, immersed, returning its carnality without alluding in any moment to it, without naming it.  The periscope-kaleidoscope, however, is an optical instrument, meaning that we can be immediately induced to think that it will disembody the spectator, which is accentuated by the nature of the images which it registers: repetition, series, variation, all favoured themes of abstract painting.

Moreover, in opposition to the painting in perspective, where the surface is the veil of contact and superposition of the real and the ideal, the periscope-kaleidoscope clearly shows that at both ends of it there are two completely adjacent realities, behaving therefore as an element of continuity between two fields of the same nature.  The look thus recuperates desire, the carnal impulse denied it by the technology of vision.  That which we observe through the artefacts of Komatsu returns our glance, it is not like pornography, but like practising the act of love.

The path covered seems to be a path in reverse, towards the embodiment of the look.  However, it is carried out within a purely optical discipline, the game of abstraction.  The territory of the body is recuperated without touching it, without mutilating it and even without even rubbing against it, in a completely hygienic manner, without any exhibitionism.  The most difficult route has thus been chosen: to work on the body without even naming it, without falling into the celebration of revenge, that is, without demonising abstraction, and more so, making use of it as an instrument, not as an object.

小松敏宏 〜身体のための視覚装置〜
フェルナンド・ケサダ
(『O Monografias Body』所収 2002年5月スペイン、バルセロナ)
翻訳:西野真季


 ギャラリーや美術館の空間は、つくり上げられた歴史的空間と同じとみなされうる。展覧会のコミッショナー、さらには美術館のディレクター、プログラム作成者の役割とは、会場の与えられた環境に様々な作品を設置して、そこに文脈を持った構造を与えることである。その構造により、より広い枠組みの中で、展覧会より以前に起こったものを過去から取り入れることが容易になる。こうして、芸術作品が展示されている空間と美術史それ自体の間にアナロジーを打ち立てることができる。

 小松敏宏は、「展望鏡/カレイドスコープ」を展示する壁や床に孔を穿つ。彼は壁を横切る網状のわな、または巣穴を築くが、それは壁と鋳造された鉄の梁を横切っている。この網状の巣穴によって、観者は展覧会の外の場所へと続く道をたどるよう促される。さらに重要なことにその場所は、展覧会の会場そのものに潜在していながら、新たな存在としての個々の展示作品によって、通常は隠されている。

 内側に鏡をもつ展望鏡は、観察者に2つの現象を引き起こす。一つは、光場optical fieldを乗法的に増やすことmultiply、もう一つは身体とその感覚能力を延長させる、つまり身体の感覚を無限に引き延ばすことである。二つ目の現象は感覚器官を外へと投げ出す一つ目の現象があってのみ可能になる。

 こうして万華鏡のようなプリズムは複雑だが連続した編み目、野うさぎやもぐらのようなげっ歯類の巣穴を多少なりとも模したようなもの、を作り上げる。空間図式は、存在するものに課せられてはいるが、壁と天井の表面に穿たれて別の空間領域へとつながり、暗く隠された領域を照らし出す。それは隣接する部屋、展覧会場の内側や外側、また上階や下階、などであるかもしれない。

 展望鏡が、穿つ対象の空間的知覚を変容することは明らかだが、それらはどの程度、時間と我々の時間の表象を穿つのだろうか?

 展望鏡は、さまざまな場所の間にある空間的な差異に影響を与えるのと同様に、空間と異なる時間的差異にも影響を与え、あらゆることを同時に引き起こして閉回路録音と同様に機能しうるのだが、小松の作品ではそのようには機能していない。

 小松の作品では、次の2つの状況が同時に設定されている。空間的に感覚回路が開かれること(さらされた空間、アートスペース)、そして時間のうちに感覚回路が開かれること(作品を鑑賞する時間、孔を穿たれた場所の生命)。例えば、床に孔を穿ち下階を可視的にする展望鏡を覗き込むとき、全方向的な知覚的注意のおかげで、下階で起こっていることを見ているばかりでなく、展望鏡によって自分自身も下方へと投影されている。展望鏡は我々を下と上、空間と時間の両方に同時に置く。時間と空間は異なるものの、両者が我々の身体を乗法的に増やす仕方は、視覚装置のなかの万華鏡の鏡像が増やされる仕方と同じである。

  "Adjoining Spaces"と "Observatory" において、この操作は展覧会の会場で行われており、美術館の数部屋からなる空間と、一つの部屋分の空間それぞれに孔を開け、それぞれの場をつなげる巣穴を設置する。

 まさにこの操作を見捨てられた日本の伝統家屋に施したのが”O-House”であるが、ここでは結果的に別の類いの穿孔が空間に、またより強調的に時間へもなされている。この作品では、この家の過去の瞬間が、その今現在の姿と共に照らし出されており、採掘者のように、複数の場と瞬間の間に、用水路または感覚的回路を開く効果がある。それらの場と瞬間はさまざまに隔たりながら同じ座標に属しているが、感覚的回路の開通と共に新たな画像や風景をつくりあげる。それは観者各々が展望鏡を覗き込み身を浸すたびに生み出すイメージの無限の複数性に他ならない。断片的なイメージは、無秩序で多様な作品周辺の現実の模倣でもなければ、ある風景の複製としての顕微鏡やカメラ、ドキュメンタリーでもない。断片化したイメージはむしろ、横梁の形ながら、過去ではなく未来に投影された表象のようである。というのも、ひとたび展望鏡に身を浸した観者は、同じ場所が別々の瞬間ヘ向けて発する投影を体験しつつも、自分自身の時間を完全に意識しているからだ。このことを逆に言うなら、自分のいる空間的な位置を十分に意識しながら、同時に別の場所に投影されるともいえる。観察者は光学的に過去と現在、こことあちらの同時性のうちに、不断の新しいイメージの連鎖をつくりだすのである。

 19世紀の中頃、ボードレールは万華鏡を覗いて得られる経験を、現代的凝視gaze、大都市での感覚的衝撃によって断片化された注視lookの真髄と見なした。当時万華鏡は絶大な人気を誇っていたが、それは万華鏡が不可能を可能にしたという単純な理由からである。(万華鏡という)制御された枠のうちに、現実の断片化した世界を捉えるからだ。同時に万華鏡は人々の目を、不可避の万華鏡的な注視に対して鍛えることで、刺激された混沌から網膜が外傷を受けないようにした。

 この万華鏡的注視は身体を眠りにつかせ、他の感覚の行使を徹底して最小化した。万華鏡はこうして人気となったのだが、例えば同じような特徴をもつ音響装置が19世紀後半かそれより後に、大衆娯楽の対象になり得た可能性を想像するのは難しい。一つ例にとれば、都会の喧噪を模した楽器、未来派のルイジ・ルッソロによるイントナルモリintonarumori(1)が創案され利用されたとき、それは20世紀前半であっても珍しいものであったが、歴史的アヴァンギャルドのエリート的実験サークルの外部では、全く何の意味も持たない装置であった。こうして、万華鏡という視覚装置の人気から、ボードレールは近代の大都市の市民を、「良識を備えた万華鏡」と表現したくなった。

 これらの万華鏡を、建築的なスペクタクルのうち最も良く知られた、ブルーノ・タウトによる「ガラス・パヴィリオン」(1914年ドイツ工作連盟ケルン展)と比べることが重要である。詩人パウル・シェーアバルトに捧げられたこの作品には、洞窟の上に設置された万華鏡がある。現代の原型archetypeである、光学的で、透明で、輝き軽やかなそれは、古代の原型、触知可能で、形が無く、暗く洞窟のようなもの、の上に漂う。タウトのパヴィリオンでは、透明なドームが彩色ガラスと切子面の形態で造られた万華鏡的構造物をなしている。その結果生じる効果は、純粋な光と動きのスペクタクルのようなもの、万華鏡的光学を3次元に翻訳した、建築的な視覚のシンフォニーであったに違いない。しかし、このドームのもとでは、観者はどんな現実、自分の生きる場所や時間と異なる時空へも受入れられることはなく、現実と歴史の外側の、座標軸を持たない場所に置かれる。そこでは、身体は自制しながらも自律的で確固たるものではなく、代わりに彩色ガラスのドームによりつくられる感覚的な環境と一つになっている。

 小松の展望鏡でもまた、目覚めるための第一歩のように、ほんの一瞬ながら身体が周囲の環境にとけ込んでおり、その最初の段階として光学的浸透が起こる。しかしながら、明確な座標軸を持つイメージを作り出した身体は、望遠鏡ごしに下階や隣室にいる別の観者が通り過ぎるのを観察するときに起こるように、即座に現在に送り返される。こうして、空間的かつ感覚的な媒介である周囲の環境と、身体そのものという二者による全体性から求められる構築物は何も無く、むしろ、権力、技術、そしてコミュニケーション手段によって消されがちな身体の現前が強調される。

 1745年にコンディヤックは、網膜を刺激する光線が網膜のうちに感覚を作り出すと述べた。光線の反対側にある観察される対象のうちではなく、私たちの眼のなかだけに感覚は生じるのだ。そうであれば、光線が網膜を刺激するたびに、手で杖をそのつど握るに等しくなるだろう。コンディヤックにとって眼とは、まさに杖を与えられた二つの手のようなものであり、目に現れている小さな杖は、眼を表象の固定された場所にしている。そうであるなら、我々の存在は他の何であるよりも、ひとつの眼なのである。

 一見するとこの洞察は、文化が徹底的に視覚中心である今、全てが眼に映り全てが平板化されるので、予言のように思えるかもしれない。

 伝統的な遠近法においては、対照的で空虚な契機として、架空ながら常に充たされるべきものとしての消失点と視点がある。コンディヤックはその契機の一つとして、網膜をおいた。それ以来、現代の絵画を考察する際には身体は消失させられ、純粋な眼となったと言える。しかし、美術の歴史の上でこうした観察者の非身体化への偏りが強調されるたびに、とりわけ遠近法や写真、映画やコンピューターとその極度に平面的な画面のような革新の際に、純粋な眼ではなく見る身体としての観者を補完し、再調整ないし改革する要素がつねに導入される。この系列のなかに、小松の視覚装置は位置づけられる。

 小松の装置を通じた眺めは視覚的ではなく生理学的であるため、現代絵画を観ることと同じではない。明らかに万華鏡のプリズムは抽象的な絵画を作り出す機械だが、小松の作品ではそうはならず、プリズムが提供する絵の一部に時間、身体的な時間でしかないもの、が入り込む。抽象的で非身体的な眼は再び自らの身体を取り戻すのだが、その最も明瞭な徴証として、万華鏡に物理的時間を招き入れる。

 展望鏡の作り出す場所はこうして、観者の前に置かれた光景ではなく取り囲むもの、包囲空間となる。そして、時間は観者のために作り上げられたものではなく、観者が装置を見るたびにそのつどつくり出さねばならない。それは局所化された時間、今この瞬間である。そして同時に空間に関してこの作品は、確固たるこの場hereに関わる。展望鏡はこの場のために、どんな時空の統合性も提供しないが、代わりに座標軸は提供する。その座標軸は、観者の場所や観察する瞬間に応じて変化し、展望鏡がつなぐ隣接する空間の別の観者の存在によっても変化する。

 鏡は文字通り私たちの像を投影するように置かれているが、私たちを取り巻くものの断片も乗法的に増やす。そうすることで、身体が沈み込み、取り巻かれ、浸され、どんな瞬間も肉体性carnalityを言及したり名指したりすること無く、肉体性に戻るような環境をつくりだす。しかし展望鏡/カレイドスコープは光学的な道具なので、観者を肉体から離れさせるだろうと短絡的に思い込んでしまうかもしれない。それが見せるイメージの本性、反復、連続、変化などの抽象絵画に好まれたテーマによっても、肉体の分離が強調されるもの、と。

 さらに、遠近法的な絵画の表面は理想と現実が触れ合い重なり合うヴェールのようだが、それに対して展望鏡/カレイドスコープは、両端にぴったりと隣接する二つの現実があることを明らかに示しており、同じ本性を持つ2つの領域をつなぐ連続性の要素として働いている。こうしてこの装置からの注視は、欲望、視覚技術によって拒まれた肉体的衝動を取り戻す。小松の装置を通じて我々が観察するものから、我々はグランス/一瞥glance (2)を取り戻すのだ。しかしそれはポルノではなく、愛の行為の実践のようである。

 この道筋は、注視の具現化へ向けた逆方向の道筋に思えるかもしれない。しかしこれは純粋に視覚的な規律、抽象のゲームのなかで遂行されている。身体の領域は取り戻されるが、触れること無く、損なうこと無く、擦れ合うことさえもなく、全く衛生的に、どんな自己顕示も無しになされる。こうして、最も困難なやり方が選ばれている。身体を名指すこと無く、復讐の賛美に陥らずに、つまり抽象を悪魔扱いせずに、抽象を対象としてではなく道具として利用することでなおさらそのように、身体に働きかけるのである。


訳注)
(1)元は画家として未来派の運動に参加したルイジ・ロッソロが、日常的な騒音をモティーフとす「騒音芸術」のために作り出した装置の名称。

(2)  おそらく筆者は、Norman Bryson による「gaze」(注視)と「glance」(一瞥)の対比を前提にしている。Brysonは前者を純粋なものとみなし、感情を帯びた後者と区別した。( 参考:Vision and Painting: The Logic of the Gaze, Yale University Press, 1983)